Karen the Possibility Coach

/Karen Ribeiro

About Karen Ribeiro

Karen Ribeiro is a writer and serial entrepreneur who is trained in Possibility Management and has created an innovative system for efficient processing of emotional triggers for maximum life enhancement. Her InnerFortune journaling process has been adapted for team development and creative problem solving both personally and professionally. She has an MBA and undergraduate degrees in Marketing and Interpersonal Communications.

Musings on Sovereignty

On May 17, 2004 the state of Massachusetts gave same sex couples the right to marry each other. While this was a monumental victory for the LGBT community, unleashing an intense freedom and sense of possibility in the minds, the spirits, and the physical bodies of each person in a same sex relationship in Massachusetts and beyond, one has to wonder about the power that a governing body like the state of Massachusetts has over the lives of those who chose to live or work under its authority. Articles like this from Wikipedia remind us that such governing bodies [shall?] only have authority over that which they are granted by the collective, while this VT Digger article highlights how a state can artfully question the impositions of international authority on behalf of its citizens, and this Slate article delves deeper into the complications of a "higher" Federal authority to refute state sovereignty in the matter of same sex couples. The will of the people underlies the sovereignty of both the U.S. federal government and the states, but neither sovereignty is absolute and each operates within a system of dual sovereignty. According to the reservation clause of the Tenth Amendment, the federal state possesses only those powers delegated to it by the

By | December 16th, 2016|Blog|0 Comments

Global Feast of Chocolate Cake

  Imagine a room of round tables, each of which seats eight people from a diverse spectrum of cultural, economic, political, religious and physical circumstances and beliefs. Their task? To fairly divide one big slice of the best chocolate cake ever baked. (for argument’s sake it is gluten- dairy- and all allergen-free so that it can be enjoyed by everyone). What scenarios could we expect? The Best Chocolate Cake Ever Created Someone might propose using a scale to weigh their slice of cake and divide the number by eight, then somehow dividing it into eight equal parts. But some would have more of less icing than others. The ones with more icing might say they don’t even like icing and feel uncomfortable with others’ stares of jealousy. Maybe they’ve had these stares their whole life and have simply gotten used to saying they don’t like icing just to mitigate or stave off the stares. Maybe they don’t even know if they like icing?! Or maybe this is the first time in their life that someone else has been jealous of something they had, so they are inclined to completely revel or bask in the glow of others’ envy… Some at the table might say they don’t

By | December 15th, 2016|Blog|0 Comments

Boredom in a World Gone Mad

  Watching old movies is an interesting way to take note of just how mad the world used to be. How could people swear in movies from the 1980’s the way they did? So out of context! Or, more importantly, how could writers and producers script women like the heroic tramp Jamie Lee Curtis played in Trading Places? If we watch any film produced more than 10-20 years ago, we could easily find it dreadfully boring by today’s standards. What’s that called? Oh yeah, quaint. Appreciated only by old people. Teenage boys don’t like quaint. Teenage boys get bored easily. They gravitate toward mad video games to keep themselves entertained. Parents of teenage boys, like myself, try things like canceling cable to minimize exposure to programming that we deem blatantly mad and predatorially subtle to a child. We did this years ago instead of getting rid of the television altogether because we like movies, but Netflix and Red Box market their most violent, morality numbing offerings front and center. And once a teenage boy has a job, there is little stopping him from buying a Netflix subscription. Parents try to shield their children from aspects of the world gone mad. On the one extreme we get

By | December 15th, 2016|Blog|0 Comments

How Climate Change is Like Sex

  Disclaimer: this post is metaphorical. The universal relationship challenges in a committed relationship are being compared to the intelligence in nature that one becomes aware of — and increasingly committed to serving — the more one investigates climate science and ecosystem disciplines. Humans are being called to “listen” to and partner with such ecosystems in a more mature, respectful manner. Who, other than children with hormones that have yet to kick in, doesn’t enjoy great sex (even if it has been a while)? Can we all agree that we all would enjoy healthy, mutually responsive, adoring, hot and steamy sex? If so, this is a good start to a decent climate change conversation. Why? Because we all have to find a place of open and honest mutuality, or common ground, so that the important work at hand can get underway. Yesterday. So let’s get specific. Great sex is a win-win. Let’s assume, for this scenario, two people have been having great sex for many years – like “forever” – but recently it has become painfully evident that one partner is not feeling altogether supported and nurtured. This partner is raging inside and has learned quickly that the blame game, wagging a finger in the face

By | December 15th, 2016|Blog|0 Comments

Saving a Few Offerings

When one stops attending to anything – like a website, it atrophies – or nearly disappears! Here are just a few posts recreated from an irregular stream of posts since 2007: Trailing Off… The weather this past weekend was as good as it gets; not humid, slight breeze, sunny. And it was a very rare Saturday where I had nothing scheduled! I decided to take my dog Shaggy for a walk at Wentworth Farm, the idyllic dog walking spot in Amherst, but he didn’t want to go. So instead I figured I’d try to find an entrance to the Robert Frost Trail in that same vicinity. It wasn’t working out. I accosted a stranger walking in the area who also didn’t know a trail entrance but knew it was nearby… The parking lot behind the Amherst Chinese Christian Church proved a great spot. I found a sweet path and laid down a tiny blanket in a sandy clearing. While eating my sandwich and asking the ants to kindly not crawl up my shorts I read the GAIA student magazine I’d picked up the previous night at the Amherst College planetarium (an amazing presentation by Kevin Collins about the New Horizons 9-year voyage to Pluto about to

By | August 23rd, 2016|Blog|0 Comments